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Postfix Configuration Parameters, Feb 8 2008
To enable the delay, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
To enable this feature, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Use of the bare hostname as the per-site table lookup key is discouraged. Always use the full destination nexthop (enclosed in [] with a possible ":port" suffix). A recipient domain or MX-enabled transport next-hop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination.
The TLS policy table is indexed by the full next-hop destination, which is either the recipient domain, or the verbatim next-hop specified in the transport table, $local_transport, $virtual_transport, $relay_transport or $default_transport. This includes any enclosing square brackets and any non-default destination server port suffix. The LMTP socket type prefix (inet: or unix:) is not included in the lookup key.
When the lookup key is a domain name without enclosing square brackets or any :port suffix (typically the recipient domain), and the full domain is not found in the table, just as with the transport(5) table, the parent domain starting with a leading "." is matched recursively. This allows one to specify a security policy for a recipient domain and all its sub-domains.
Match subdomains of the example.com domain, i.e. match a name in the server certificate that consists of a non-zero number of labels followed by a .example.com suffix. Case distinctions are ignored.

Postfix Configuration Parameters, Feb 8 2008
To enable the delay, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
To enable this feature, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Use of the bare hostname as the per-site table lookup key is discouraged. Always use the full destination nexthop (enclosed in [] with a possible ":port" suffix). A recipient domain or MX-enabled transport next-hop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination.
The TLS policy table is indexed by the full next-hop destination, which is either the recipient domain, or the verbatim next-hop specified in the transport table, $local_transport, $virtual_transport, $relay_transport or $default_transport. This includes any enclosing square brackets and any non-default destination server port suffix. The LMTP socket type prefix (inet: or unix:) is not included in the lookup key.
When the lookup key is a domain name without enclosing square brackets or any :port suffix (typically the recipient domain), and the full domain is not found in the table, just as with the transport(5) table, the parent domain starting with a leading "." is matched recursively. This allows one to specify a security policy for a recipient domain and all its sub-domains.
Match subdomains of the example.com domain, i.e. match a name in the server certificate that consists of a non-zero number of labels followed by a .example.com suffix. Case distinctions are ignored.

Postfix Configuration Parameters, Feb 8 2008
To enable the delay, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
To enable this feature, specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Specify a non-zero time value (an integral value plus an optional one-letter suffix that specifies the time unit).
Use of the bare hostname as the per-site table lookup key is discouraged. Always use the full destination nexthop (enclosed in [] with a possible ":port" suffix). A recipient domain or MX-enabled transport next-hop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination.
The TLS policy table is indexed by the full next-hop destination, which is either the recipient domain, or the verbatim next-hop specified in the transport table, $local_transport, $virtual_transport, $relay_transport or $default_transport. This includes any enclosing square brackets and any non-default destination server port suffix. The LMTP socket type prefix (inet: or unix:) is not included in the lookup key.
When the lookup key is a domain name without enclosing square brackets or any :port suffix (typically the recipient domain), and the full domain is not found in the table, just as with the transport(5) table, the parent domain starting with a leading "." is matched recursively. This allows one to specify a security policy for a recipient domain and all its sub-domains.
Match subdomains of the example.com domain, i.e. match a name in the server certificate that consists of a non-zero number of labels followed by a .example.com suffix. Case distinctions are ignored.

Postfix TLS Support, Feb 8 2008
parameter, with any enclosing square brackets and optional port. Take care to be consistent: the suffixes ":smtp" or ":25" or no port suffix result in different policy table lookup keys, even though they are functionally equivalent nexthop specifications. Use at most one of these forms for all destinations. Below, the policy table has multiple keys, just in case the transport table entries are not specified consistently.
Note: Avoid policy lookups with the bare hostname (for example, "example.net"). Instead, use the destination (for example, ":587"), as the per-site table lookup key (a recipient domain or MX-enabled transport nexthop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination). With Postfix 2.3 and later, do not use the obsolete per-site table; use the new policy table instead.
Note: Avoid policy lookups with the bare hostname (for example, "tls.example.com"). Instead, use the destination (for example, "") as the per-site table lookup key (a recipient domain or MX-enabled transport nexthop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination). With Postfix 2.3 and later, do not use the obsolete per-site table; use the new policy table instead.
The TLS policy table is indexed by the full next-hop destination, which is either the recipient domain, or the verbatim next-hop specified in the transport table, $local_transport, $virtual_transport, $relay_transport or $default_transport. This includes any enclosing square brackets and any non-default destination server port suffix. The LMTP socket type prefix (inet: or unix:) is not included in the lookup key.
When the lookup key is a domain name without enclosing square brackets or any :port suffix (typically the recipient domain), and the full domain is not found in the table, just as with the transport(5) table, the parent domain starting with a leading "." is matched recursively. This allows one to specify a security policy for a recipient domain and all its sub-domains.
Avoid policy lookups with the bare hostname. Instead, use the full destination nexthop (enclosed in [] with a possible ":port" suffix) as the per-site table lookup key (a recipient domain or MX-enabled transport nexthop with no port suffix may look like a bare hostname, but is still a suitable destination). With Postfix 2.3 and later, use of the obsolete approach documented here is strongly discouraged: use the new policy table instead.

Postfix manual - bounce(5), Feb 8 2008
The second portion of a bounce template consists of mes- sage text. As the above example shows, template message text may contain main.cf $parameters. Besides the parame- ters that are defined in main.cf, the following parameters are treated specially depending on the suffix that is appended to their name.
delay_warning_time_suffix
parameter, expressed in the time unit specified by suffix, which is one of seconds, minutes, hours,
maximal_queue_lifetime_suffix
time parameter, expressed in the time unit speci- fied by suffix. See above under delay_warning_time
for possible suffix values.

Postfix Lookup Table Overview, Feb 8 2008
A sorted, balanced tree structure. This is available only on systems with support for Berkeley DB databases. Database files are created with the postmap(1) or postalias(1) command. The lookup table name as used in "btree:table" is the database file name without the ".db" suffix.
The lookup table name as used in "cdb:table" is the database file name without the ".cdb" suffix. This feature is available with Postfix 2.2 and later.
An indexed file type based on hashing. This is available only on systems with support for DBM databases. Database files are created with the postmap(1) or postalias(1) command. The lookup table name as used in "dbm:table" is the database file name without the ".dir" or ".pag" suffix.
An indexed file type based on hashing. This is available only on systems with support for Berkeley DB databases. Database files are created with the postmap(1) or postalias(1) command. The database name as used in "hash:table" is the database file name without the ".db" suffix.
An indexed file type based on hashing. This is available only on systems with support for SDBM databases. Database files are created with the postmap(1) or postalias(1) command. The lookup table name as used in "sdbm:table" is the database file name without the ".dir" or ".pag" suffix.

Postfix CDB Howto, Feb 8 2008
Postfix CDB databases are specified as "cdb:name", where name specifies the CDB file name without the ".cdb" suffix (another suffix, ".tmp", is used temporarily while a CDB file is under construction). CDB databases are maintained with the postmap(1)

Postfix SMTP Access Policy Delegation, Feb 8 2008
Lines 2, 11: the Postfix spawn(8) daemon by default kills its child process after 1000 seconds. This is too short for a policy daemon that may run for as long as an SMTP client is connected to an SMTP server process. The default time limit is overruled in main.cf with an explicit "policy_time_limit" setting. The name of the parameter is the name of the master.cf entry ("policy") concatenated with the "_time_limit" suffix.
Lines 2, 6: the Postfix spawn(8) daemon by default kills its child process after 1000 seconds. This is too short for a policy daemon that may run for as long as an SMTP client is connected to an SMTP server process. The default time limit is overruled in main.cf with an explicit "policy_time_limit" setting. The name of the parameter is the name of the master.cf entry ("policy") concatenated with the "_time_limit" suffix.

Postfix SASL Howto, Feb 8 2008
The name of the configuration file (default: smtpd.conf) will be constructed from a value that the Postfix SMTP server sends to the Cyrus SASL library, which adds the suffix .conf. The value is configured using one of the following variables:

Postfix Berkeley DB Howto, Feb 8 2008
Berkeley DB implements the Postfix database type "hash" and "btree". The name of a Postfix Berkeley DB database is the name of the database file without the ".db" suffix. Berkeley DB databases are maintained with the postmap(1) command.

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